20 cities are doing just that in an effort to regulate your smartphones

Federal law prohibits businesses from restricting access to Wi-Fi and other broadband networks after hours, and employees are not required to help maintain these systems. But governments and municipalities across the U.S. have long…

20 cities are doing just that in an effort to regulate your smartphones

Federal law prohibits businesses from restricting access to Wi-Fi and other broadband networks after hours, and employees are not required to help maintain these systems.

But governments and municipalities across the U.S. have long pushed for “right-to-disconnect” laws to address a growing problem: How do you restrict the use of some Wi-Fi technology, but allow other technologies?

Ottawa, Ontario, one of Canada’s largest cities, is proposing a local right-to-disconnect law that would benefit telecommunications companies and ISPs, who rely on DSL connections, for which the State of California regulates only 911/Telecom number access.

The government and municipality have indicated that a time when government-affiliated departments could interfere with the infrastructure and services that have become so commonplace and profitable. Information utility is new to all of us. It is now expanding to all the apps that you use and listening to all of your conversations, and it becomes difficult to regulate. The words “right-to-disconnect” grab our attention.

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Apple has been working on a new home-media networking product that would “allow users to turn on Wi-Fi automatically and automatically disconnect,” according to a report by Wall Street Journal. Presumably, a patent application filed in 2012 by Apple would be more challenging for local governments than a city right-to-disconnect law.

The governments also want to keep telecom infrastructure tech from becoming like a key, not unlike that of your keys or keys to your house. Yet, the policing of our electronics is largely concerning us when businesses let their workers access private wifi networks for personal use.

Read the rest of the story at The Flyers.

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