An ’eminent Domain’: Sydney’s citizens to get ‘swimmable’ water

A long-awaited study for making the water near Sydney’s downtown and bar district ‘swimmable’ has been finished. The report by consultancy firm Grant Thornton on how to make Darling Harbour, central to Sydney’s main…

An 'eminent Domain': Sydney's citizens to get 'swimmable' water

A long-awaited study for making the water near Sydney’s downtown and bar district ‘swimmable’ has been finished.

The report by consultancy firm Grant Thornton on how to make Darling Harbour, central to Sydney’s main harbor center, swimmable concluded the costs are “not beyond reasonable control.”

Three options were examined, including the establishment of a charging station for tourists who want to bathe in the harbour.

Mayor Clover Moore has previously told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation there would be “a relatively short charging ‘mission'” after which public baths will be open to the public.

Mayor Moore, who owns Sydney’s largest pollieau — a small mansion — told media Tuesday the city was “obsessed” with the issue.

She believes the most common misconception is that the waterfront also has kiddie pools.

“It’s packed with families… there’s a swarm of them all day long, in fact you cannot get away from it.”

“I feel like I’m very much in a movie — I’ve jumped in, I’ve leaped in — but the movies do end and we’re going to be here another few weeks longer.”

Problems that emerged in 2012 when the city introduced separated shower and bathing areas for the homeless prompted some to refer to it as the “Jungle.”

In 2014 a privately owned apartment block at Darling Harbour was set ablaze because it had been converted into a homeless shelter.

Clover Moore described the blaze as a “reflection of our worst sides as a city, as a community and as a state.”

Last year, Sydney Life magazine wrote that the waterfront “has one of the most extreme views of the world… The views are spectacular — however, the seagull’s choice of habitat are anything but. Two consecutive summers of great blue herons giving the area a landing site is testimony to the abundant food for animals in the sand dunes.”

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