New world pneumonia vaccine 90% effective

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption It’s been found that a COVID-19 vaccine helps children block the deadly infection in less than 30 minutes One of the first vaccines to be licensed in Europe…

New world pneumonia vaccine 90% effective

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption It’s been found that a COVID-19 vaccine helps children block the deadly infection in less than 30 minutes

One of the first vaccines to be licensed in Europe against pneumococcal disease has been proven to be at least 90% effective.

The pneumonia vaccine COVID-19 was used in older kids when it was invented in the 1980s.

However, studies in children up to three years old have shown that the vaccine can halt the disease in less than half an hour.

It will now be used around the world.

The results were announced by the International Vaccine Access Centre (IVAC) at the World Health Organization (WHO).

The group was set up by the world’s biggest vaccine maker, Pfizer.

The vaccine will now be licensed for use in over 70 countries.

It will be available in Britain from January next year, although the number of children vaccinated is still yet to be confirmed.

“This development is an important step towards ensuring safe and effective vaccine preventable diseases are available to all children,” said Dr Fiona Meech, chief executive of IVAC.

“Through the current financing structure of the world’s vaccine programs, children will not be denied access to vaccines and countries will have the funding to roll out this vaccine.”

Playwright and actor Jack Whitehall, who was born in 1994, said it was a big achievement.

“In just over 15 years, the world has pushed forward a project aimed at saving young lives, in the same way Star Wars broke glass for the whole world by showing us the future of space travel. The research and development started in the UK in the 90s, funded and carried out in many countries around the world in the 21st century.”

Senior director of the Immunisation Collaborating Centre and professor of infectious diseases at Imperial College London, Professor Paul Whiteman, said he was thrilled by the news.

“This is an important milestone in the future vaccination of children, who can now be protected by an innovative pneumococcal vaccine without complications, saving lives and improving the wellbeing of millions of young children in developing countries,” he said.

You can read more about the vaccines HERE.

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