Singapore Airlines Employees to be Treated Like They’re at Risk for Ebola — Will They Be Let Go Later?

Photo Airline staff at Singapore Airlines, who are susceptible to certain airborne diseases like Ebola, will have to undergo “natural immunity training” which teaches them to avoid those diseases so they are less likely…

Singapore Airlines Employees to be Treated Like They’re at Risk for Ebola — Will They Be Let Go Later?

Photo

Airline staff at Singapore Airlines, who are susceptible to certain airborne diseases like Ebola, will have to undergo “natural immunity training” which teaches them to avoid those diseases so they are less likely to get infected themselves, reports The Straits Times.

The airline has announced plans to conduct these immunization sessions at each of the 24 of its locations — or even in groups of four people. So far, details of which diseases have been identified, as well as how these days and flights might be selected, have not been revealed.

See also: Emirates, Emirates and Emirates: Premature Baby Deaths Caused by Globally Breached Strict Standards

Senior airline officials would explain the purpose of these sessions and explain why they are taking place. Some staff have responded to the news, saying they were not ready to be vaccinated and therefore reluctant to do their job, and were having to put their job at risk as a result.

Workers at Singapore Airlines are currently at risk of contracting dangerous diseases because of the airline’s fleet of 19 Boeing 777s, which contain certain devices for collecting and transporting up to 150 passengers.

Besides forcing employees to undergo the first-ever vaccinations at work, the airline also wants them to be prepared to wear personal protective equipment when working on the planes, most likely designed for dealing with smallpox.

Although the flu vaccine has been shown to have no real antiviral properties, Health Minister Gan Kim Yong said at a press conference on Monday that tests by government officials showed that a flu vaccine would probably “delay the onset of symptoms.”

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