Test your golfing knowledge with our quiz and find out who’s better, a caddie or a golfer?

What makes a good caddie? This quiz has you covered. This Valentine’s Day, golfing is the main dish. Pete’s Sports Saloon is offering a package for couples called “Love at the Tee,” and it…

Test your golfing knowledge with our quiz and find out who’s better, a caddie or a golfer?

What makes a good caddie? This quiz has you covered.

This Valentine’s Day, golfing is the main dish. Pete’s Sports Saloon is offering a package for couples called “Love at the Tee,” and it includes overnight accommodations, a two-night stay in a Royal George winery mansion, a round of golf at Royal Washington and dinner at Pud’s Donuts.

Members of Pete’s Golf Society (PGS) pay $10,000 a year to play and watch tournaments at Blue Duck and The Castle in the elite Woodmont Estate Association.

Membership in PGS also means unlimited rounds and low prices for caddies; this rate is only available to PGS members and donors to The Woodmont Golf Foundation.

The PGS includes a caddie for every hole but the two you play in each round. (At the event, you meet the man of your dreams on the 17th tee, or six holes in the morning, and receive a golf membership or PGS membership at the eventual partner course.) The membership or caddie cost varies from $8,800 to $10,000 a year, depending on whether you play regularly or just occasionally.

PGS has 27 caddies. Before I told you about their high pay rates, I spent time with a few on a practice day at Par-3 Club.

The caddies in the PGS are ex-military and police officers and former military. They come from all walks of life and average around $27 to $30 an hour. Caddies like to make special demands on their clients, like traveling on the course or escorting them to the clubhouse.

A caddie also tells you what they are doing so you know when to get off, and when to start. If the course is slow and you’re the only one on the course, for example, the caddie will either cover your ball better or give you a lesson. They also tell you what you are doing and how to do it better.

Pete’s calls the PGS experience the best from a golf standpoint. Indeed, you get so close to the players that they forget how to play.

We talked to a few caddies, and their interesting stories of their days were fun to hear. One was a lieutenant in the Navy and a police officer. Another was a superintendent and a former U.S. Postal Inspector. Still another had been in the Army. A fourth was a doctor.

Every caddie told us that they enjoy a special bond with their clients. They have many years of experience to draw from and often have caddied for their clients since they were kids.

Many of these men told us they have had four, five, six or even 10 caddies in the same year. Some have had more than 100 caddies, but the number of caddies is not a marker of success or failure.

And, as one caddie said, “It’s hard to have a better life than the caddie life.”

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